Posted in Emotions

It’s in the DNA… Pt 2

I said we would post as much as possible now we are both working and out of furlough, aiming to post once a week and unfortunately last week it just wasn’t possible. I would love to fib to you all and say I didn’t have time but to be honest I just didn’t have the emotional strength and need to pull myself through how I felt about the genetics results.

So first I’ve had my little pity party and it’s time to pull myself together – or at least that has been what I’ve told myself since the last post and I do feel a lot better, I needed to process and understand but unfortunately I was too quick to blame myself and wallow.

I thought I had gotten past the blame game but obviously it only takes one letter to put you right back there again, back in that pit of guilt and anger. Thankfully it didn’t take too long to crawl back out and I managed to do it naturally without having to fall back on the medication I once took for depression and anxiety. It shows how far I have grown in the last 18 months.

I know that there is nothing I could have done differently which would have stopped William having special needs.

I know also know that the additional material he has may not be the cause of his needs and delays.

It doesn’t matter that the additional material came from me, what matters is that anything more sinister has been ruled out.

I can hand on heart say that I love William more than life itself, not in spite of the challenges his needs bring but because of them. I think they make us as a family appreciate each other more. They make us look at the world in a different way and seek out understanding for other children like William.

God only give us what we can handle, its not always going to be easy but it is possible. He knew how hard we would fight for William and how much love we would have to give him. Its hard to have faith sometimes but I know my purpose is to nourish and love that little boy who I am honoured to call our son.

P.s William has his vaccinations today and tried to punch the nurse ๐Ÿ’‰๐ŸฅŠ but a cheeky trip to the polish bakery made it all better.

P.ss Vaccinations are also not to blame for Williams needs!

Posted in Emotions

It’s in the DNA

Males inherit the X chromosome from their mothers, the Y from their fathers.

Williams results from the genetics testing came today and its a bit of a mouthful but… there was a variation from the normal pattern wirh interstitial hemixygous copy number gain Xp22.33. The test states there is additional genetic material.

Chromosome 22 is the second smallest human chromosome (21 is the smallest) including more than 51 million DNA sectors (they’re in pairs) and represent between 1.5 and 2% of the total DNA in cells.

There is no defined link between this and autism but there are a few case studies referring to it and those with learning difficulties but not enough research has been carried out. Its is classed medically as having uncertain clinical significance.

If it has come back as nothing detected that would have been shit but manageable.

If something would have been detected on his Y chromosome I wouldn’t have blamed Dave but I am sat here now blaming myself. After all the X chromosome came from me.

Have I done this to him? To us? The paediatrician will be booking in a consultation to discuss the results in more detail and establish if further investigations are needed but now I’m terrified of what they will say… will further investigation point the finger at me even more?

I just feel like I’m back at the beginning of our journey, like all the progress we’ve made in our acceptance and grieving over a child we thought we would have hasn’t mattered and I’m back to looking at him and crying because this could all be down to me.

Posted in Appointments

Blood Ties

The purpose of literature is to turn blood into ink.

T.S Eliot

I am well aware that the above Eliot quote is not actually a direct quote but it fit nicely with my reason for today’s post. William’s dreaded blood tests.

Back in January we went to see that delightful paediatrician that told Dave off for fidgeting and spoke down to us, not that it bothered me or anything ๐Ÿ˜ก
She told us that she would refer William for some blood tests; two samples needed…
* One to check for anything in his blood that indicates something may be medically wrong with him which means autism is a symptom and not the cause.
* And the other to send for genetics testing; this will confirm our rule out genetic conditions that have or can be passed down.

  • Jan 22nd – Paediatrician

  • March 24th – Lockdown

  • May 18th – Paediatrician

  • May 26th – Blood test

  • June 8th – Blood test

The Paediatrician told us it would be a few weeks until we received a letter so when we were at at TAF meeting at the beginning of February and Sarah told us it wasn’t on his record yet but that wasn’t uncommon we weren’t worried.
BUT THEN… LOCKDOWN HAPPENED! ๐Ÿ”’
Things were still happening and a telephone appointment came through for a different paediatrician ๐Ÿ™Œ it didn’t explain what would be discussed so understandably we were nervous. I’m not sure who called but it wasn’t the first paediatrician or the one mentioned on the letter. It was a gentleman who sounded like robocop with and a strong accent and poor phone signal.

He had called to discuss Williams blood test results ๐Ÿ”ฎ you know the ones he hadn’t had yet!!

โฉโฉโฉ fast forward a few days and I get a call to say we can attend a blood test at Kingswood that afternoon, it wasn’t possible as we don’t drive and it was already 11am and by the time we had gotten 2 buses (baring in mind I haven’t gone out in public for over 60 days) we would have missed the clinic. The next one was 26th May at his paediatrician office so we went for it. Only one person could attend and it was too short notice to post a letter out to us so it was sent in a text form instead. ๐Ÿ“ฑ this contained a link to a letter about what happens at these appointments, let me go through it and tell you how useful this was to a child like William.

  • At the appointment we will talk to your child to explain what will happen and what we need them to do during the procedure. You may wish to bring a favourite toy/book as a distraction.
    This is brilliant! Three years of not been able to communicate the most simple of things like ‘Don’t bite me’, ‘Get down’ or ‘That’s Naughty’ but suddenly they are telling me that they will explain how and why they are about to restrain him and jab at him with a needle. People often ask me when we go out why I haven’t brought any toys for William. There is only one answer… William doesn’t play like other children. He isn’t interested in conventional toys and often retreats into himself in lieu of ‘playing’
  • Depending on their age and size,your child will be asked if they would prefer to sit on their parents/guardians knee. This not only gives comfort and reassurance to your child, but also helps as you are able to hold your child still for the test.
    Again you can ask William what he wants but he wont acknowledge you, If he isn’t sat on Dave’s knee then he would have wandered off from the room and this wouldn’t give William comfort as he only wants to be held on his terms. Imagine trying to restrain a pissed off octopus ๐Ÿ™
  • We have a local anaesthetic spray that we can apply to the skin prior to blood being taken at the appointment. The spray is very cold and will help numb the area.
  • Please inform staff if your child is diabetic or is being investigated for diabetes as this may affect use of this spray
  • If you do not feel that the cold spray is appropriate for your child you may prefer to use a topical numbing cream. As it takes some time to work this will need to be applied before coming to the appointment. You would need to contact your GP for a prescription for this. Talk to your pharmacist about how to use the product correctly before your appointment
  • If requesting or purchasing the topical cream please take a copy of the appointment letter ad this consent form into your GP surgery or pharmacy.
    So these four bullet points all relate to a numbing spray or cream. Should I have needed the topical cream for William then it would have been near on impossible to obtain. Called on a Friday, this link and text not received until late Friday afternoon. Bank holiday Monday. How would we have gotten into doctors? Let alone take our nonexistent letter in to them. No even going to address a consent form since it wasn’t mentioned nor sent.

Dave does all the bad appointments; you know the kind like injections or ones with people who just put your kid on edge and now blood tests, it’s not because I don’t want to take him but because he knows I would fall apart and be useless.

The first thing they asked David for when he arrived was Williams urine sample. You know the one they didn’t ask for. The one that isn’t mentioned in the text we received nor in the bullet points above. ๐Ÿ˜•
The gave Dave a vial to obtain a sample… a sample from a child who relies 100% on nappies, what is he going to go follow him around and wait for him to start weeing everywhere? They are now sending us a pack out in the post to use in his nappy. I think its just a sanitary pad kind of thing as that is what they gave us when he had been admitted to hospital.

The freeze spray was good as it made William giggle like when we put sun cream on him. Whether it numbed the area adequately is a different question to one in which we don’t have the answer for but I hope so.

๐Ÿ’‰Ever heard of a technique called dripping? I hadn’t so when Dave came home and explained that they hadn’t been able to use a needle so they let blood drip down his hand into a vial. He explained his hand was covered in blood… I’m not going to lie I freaked out! Surely this wasn’t an appropriate way to take blood? So i went straight to the internet and I couldn’t find a single thing about it on google. I read 225 pages of the WHO guidelines; best practices in phlebotomy and there was nothing in there either.

Luckily I am a member of a group on Facebook full of parents in my local area who’s children have SEN. Several of them immediately jumped onto my post to my mind at ease.
It is actually a well used method called the ‘Gravity Method’ which is basically where they stab the vein with a needle and let gravity do its thing so that blood drips into the vial until they have a adequately sized sample.

Poorly hands ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

Unfortunately they only managed to fill one vial which is marked for his genetics testing and will be sent to Leeds. This means that poor William has to go through this again in a few weeks time.๐Ÿ’‰
Thankfully they are doing a home visit next time so hopefully in his familiar surroundings he will be more calm and distractable ๐Ÿคž I will just need to make sure I have baked another treat for William once its over since despite the ‘trauma’ it didn’t stop him eating two large pieces of sponge cake.

So now the only thing we can do until the next blood test is to wait for the results of this one vial. Genetics testing recently has been taking less than 12 weeks for results however some parents have waited an extraordinary amount of time so it’s just something else we have to wait for, another count down.