Posted in Causes

Behind the eyes

As many of you may have read previously William has been at the Hull Eye Hospital a few times to check his eyesight.

When children lack eye contact, depth perception and hand eye coordination the word autism doesn’t automatically spring to mind. Doctors and healthcare professionals will try to rule out any other issues and William’s visit to the Eye Hospital was one of his first exploratory check ups.

I want to tell you about the Hull Eye Hospital and how brilliant they have been with us. The staff are all so welcoming and were knowledgeable on how to deal with a child like William, they had a slew of highly engaging toys in order to try and get him to look in the right directions so they could look at his eyes. The waiting room for children however leaves a lot to be desired which is a big reason for my post but we will get to that. They make the most of the area they have and fill it with toys and books and sometimes very noisy children waiting for theirs or their siblings appointments. This atmosphere for children like William isn’t ideal but it is still much better than most places offer.

Hospital Chief Finance Officer, Lee Bond, is going to be doing something that some of us only dream about… well in my case have nightmares about, exercise!!! To be more precise he is planning on running the London Marathon, that’s 26.22 miles. Unless my math is exceptionally wrong (a high possibility) that works out on average if you were to walk it 52,440 steps

His goal is to raise £10,000. This will enable the opening of a sensory room for children with additional needs attending the Eye Hospital at Hull Royal Infirmary. The marathon is 5 months away (granted it has been postponed as should have been April I believe) they are only 59% towards the target which I’m hopefully can change quickly in the coming months.

For us as his parents any appointment brings upon anxiety and irrational thoughts. ‘What if he’s blind?’ ‘How will he handle wearing glasses?’ Etc etc… however as you are probably aware William’s eyesight is fine although he is due another check up before he can be discharged.If it brings anxiety out in us can you imagine how the child feels? An unknown clinical place, strangers and odd smells, waiting around without your usual security blankets (William’s are currently our metal egg poacher, his changing mat or the dog) Imagine not understanding why you are in this odd place or why people are trying to force eye contact upon you when you don’t want it and never have. Waving pictures your face and holding you still.

A sensory room could lessen the trauma for patients like William. There are multiple types of sensory rooms however the main focus is to help children feel comfortable and calm, explore in a safe environment and engage childrens sense. I think we could all use one in our workplaces or even right now in our ‘home offices’ also known in our house as a baby changing table next to a window.

Please think about any savings you have made whilst we have been on lockdown and try to dig deep to support such a wonderful cause that will help so many! So I implore you, please spare anything you can and use the link below to donate. X

https://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/charity-web/charity/displayCharityCampaignPage.action?charityCampaignUrl=HullEyeHospitalSensoryRoom

Posted in Appointments, PCP & TAF Meetings

The ‘TAF’ Meeting Part 2

Tuesday 19th November 2019… We were going into today’s meeting much more prepared than its predecessor. We went armed with my trusty notebook full of comments, questions and observations.

‘TAF’ meetings – Team around family meetings.
They basically do as they say on the tin. Its a meeting in which the agencies involved in Williams development get together with his family to make sure we are all on the same page in order to help William as he gets older and to make sure we are all doing what is best for him.

Today’s guest appearances came from a member of the Early Years Development Team from Hull City Council. I never remember her name but she is lovely so I will make sure I find out. Sarah, our Health Visitor and Val, his key worker in nursery who specializes in SEN (special educational needs)

As always there is always good and bad news whenever we have an update…

Unfortunately all parties agreed that there had been little to no progress in regards to Williams development since he was initially granted level 2 funding. This was very disheartening even though we agreed with it 💔
He has now been awarded Level 1 funding which means Val will be with him all the time at nursery. This unfortunately means he won’t be spending any time with Linda which may cause a slight regression in his behaviour due to their bond but will be for the best as she isn’t SEN trained and can’t do some of things with him that Val can.

We touched on the subject of schooling 🏫 and whether he would attended a special school, a standard mainstream school or a mainstream school with special needs provisions. Although it is too early to make a decision we are putting steps in place to ensure that no matter where he enrolls he has all the support he needs.
This includes setting up a PCP (person centered planning meeting) which is to help plan certain aspects of Williams future. Starting the EHCP (educational health and care plan) process. This is needed to be put in place to ensure William would be granted a place at whichever school would be best for him regardless of catchment areas.
A referral is also being sent to the Outreach Team that deal with Ganton & Tweendykes special schools who can help support him both at nursery and at home🏡

And now for the bad…😢

Williams referral to the Autism Panel (this is a bit like the X-Factor panel but not as shit) mentioned in my previous post was stuck in limbo. Based on the Paediatricians letter he expected our GP to do the referral. We had called them the day after the letter was sent and they had confirmed it was received and they would process it.
BUT… It turns out that GP’s can no longer submit referrals of this kind and it can only be done by…

  • A Paediatrician (WTF! why didn’t he do it?)
  • A speech and language therapist (We are still waiting⌚ apparently we are near the top of the list, have been allocated a therapist but it won’t be until next year)
  • The Nursery

Sarah said as this has recently just changed she will speak with our GP, confirm what is happening and if nothing was in place she would call the nursery manager and ask her to put the referral though. She promised to let us know later that day.

We knew from an early age that William was struggling developmentally but today it was confirmed exactly how much of a delay there was. His current development is within the age group of 0 – 11 months. This hit us like a bus 🚌 as neither of us imagined he was that far behind.
This doesn’t mean he can’t catch up to his real age but the wider the gap the more difficult things will become for him but we can only take each day as it comes.

Sarah called later that day as promised showing us yet again what a superstar she is ✨
No referral was in place! She advised she wasn’t going to ask the nursery to do it… My heart sank until she explained why.
She has asked our GP to refer us back to a paediatrician who can assess William to rule out any other issues and make the referral to the ASD (autism spectrum disorder) Panel. This would prevent any further delays down the line should he undertake a Triage (this is an assessment to see if he actually needs to go to the ASD Panel at all) and they ask for this then delays his diagnosis even further (No fucking wonder there is a 2 – 3 year wait!😡)
She will chase this up for us in a few weeks if we haven’t heard anything. I honestly couldn’t praise Sarah enough for all the support she gives us.

When Dave and I left the meeting we agreed not to talk about it until we got home to let it all sink in. We don’t drive so it was a very silent and uncomfortable bus ride.
Our discussion was so positive about what we can do for him in the future, how we will handle any obstacles and how much we love him.

But Dave wasn’t feeling positive and he was trying to be strong for me. He was devastated and broke down.
‘I just want him to be happy’ he cried.
And then I cried. Not because I thought William was going to be unhappy but because Dave was crying and he had all the same fears as me.
‘He is happy and we will keep him that way. Today’s meeting doesn’t change that
Dave has seen the same videos you guys probably have of Autistic children have meltdown in the middle of things that most people take for granted like getting a haircut (we have cut Williams hair may times including once when I was using the clippers and the guard fell off… we had a bald child for a while), going food shopping or a change to their routine etc.

We will cope with these things if they arise. We may not cope well but together we will do it.

Posted in Brief updates

My Early Birthday Gift

William has been granted 2 year funding which covered an extra day at nursery during our ‘TAF’ meeting and the nursery had agreed to 1 : 1 support before receiving funding for it. The decision to grant this still had to be approved by a panel in order for the nursery to receive the funding and if this wasn’t granted the nursery wouldn’t be able to continue with it.

The phone call came on September 12th 2019… 9 days before my 30th Birthday and it was a gift that no others could beat.

Our 2nd post

His Level 1 funding meant that he would be getting 50% of his time with Val due to how his additional hours were worked out over the year instead of term time.
I am sure Val is lovely (I hadn’t met her at this point as Dave does the drop off whilst i’m at work) but leaving his previous key worker Linda was a big adjustment for William as he had grown an attachment to her and he would continuously try to seek her out when he should have been with Val. What made it more difficult is that she spent the 1st day of the week with him. Due to his attachment to her it was decided that she would remain with him rather than moving to another room in the nursery to prevent him becoming upset when she wasn’t around

We had been asked by his nursery to have his eyesight checked due to the way in which he was making his way around the facility. This is the appointment we were referring to in our post. We had gone to the doctors to request this who told us to go to the optician… who told us they needed a referral from the doctor. We went back to our GP who said they would put an appointment across to Hull and East Yorkshire Eye Hospital.
The letter came swiftly and I called my wonderful sister Helen who works in the hospital to ask about the consultant named on his letter… she had never heard of him. I looked on the online directory and nothing specific was given about said consultant. The Doctors couldn’t have got the referral wrong! could they? surely not!

My sister continuously asked about this referral to the point I was a bit shitty with her. Maybe she just hadn’t encountered this consultant before or he was new. She couldn’t know everyone at the hospital. She pushed and pushed so Dave called into our GP to confirm it was the correct type of referral. They confirmed it was. My sister was just trying to interfere… obviously that wasn’t what she was doing but its how I felt a the time.

Helen called AGAIN and said she had asked other people if they had met this consultant and they hadn’t… I called the national ‘e-Referral Service appointment line’ just to stop her pestering us and to prove her wrong.
She was right! she usually is to be fair but at this point in time I was telling myself William was my child and I knew best and I didn’t need other people sticking their noses in. The GP had in fact referred us to a Mr Fleet a consultant in Children and adolescent services – Urology department. He specialized in Paediatric surgery.
The referral was rectified by the appointment line who were very apologetic on behalf of our GP.

The appointment came and the staff at the Eye Hospital were fantastic… because let’s face how difficult it must be to conduct an eye test if the subject can speak, wont look at you or communicate with hand gestures. They ruled out any issues with his eyes but wanted a follow up appointment in a few months time to be on the safe side. We are currently waiting for this.