Posted in Appointments

Transition meeting Pt. 1

I think terrified is the best way to describe how I am feeling about William transitioning into ab school setting from his nursery. The fear keeps me awake at night as I toss and turn thinking about how he will handle a new environment and different levels of support. When I think that his days at his amazing nursery are numbered it genuinely makes my sad.

This was William just over 2 years ago on his first day at nursery, he looks so young and baby faced. He loved it whilst I sat at home and cried. I didn’t think anyone could look after my child as well as I could but I was wrong… Over the last 2 years they have helped William and myself in more ways that I could have ever anticipated, they helped me understand some of his educational needs and pushed us through the right channels for support, funding and diagnosis. Thinking that his last days are slowly coming upon us brings tears to my eye, not a single tear or quiet tears but messy heartbroken sobs. I know it is almost time for him to continue on his educational journey but i’m not quite ready to say goodbye to them 😭😭😭

Today was part one of the transition meetings to get William into the right school with the right support. Unfortunately we still haven’t received his draft EHCP however we are aware that he has been banded as intensive for the level of support he needs which is the top level. Below are the definition and school needs for children branded due to Speech, Language and Communication difficulties as Intensive or severe provided by Hull Local Offer. William easily fits into the ‘Intensive’ category however after discussing with his SENCO; Lisa, he would standardly have been placed in ‘severe’ had he have been going to a specialised school as his level of support would have been less within that environment.

LevelDescriptorsCurriculum needs
SevereVery severe expressive and/or receptive language difficulties of a specific nature, which are significantly impacting on progress and social, emotional, and behavioural development. Child/young person of broadly average ability.
or
child/young person with a very severe communication disorder, which is significantly impacting on progress and social, emotional and behavioural development.
or
child/young person’s ability to receive communication is severely limited due to a language disorder or a profound difficulty in interpersonal interaction.   Child/young person may have emerging mental health difficulties and/or experience a high level of anxiety in most school situations.
Intensive programmes to develop understanding of language, expressive language, speech intelligibility and/or social communication skills. Intensive programmes to help the child/young person develop alternative or augmentative means of communication to a level commensurate with level of ability. Differentiated programmes of study to facilitate interaction with the curriculum either by oral, signing, symbol or written systems. Programmes of support to enable the child/young person to become competent users of communication aids / technology.  
IntensiveProfound speech, language and communication needs as a result of which a child at school entry age is only likely to function below the 12-month level in relation to these skills.
and
child/young person uses primitive gestures, a few signs/symbols and/or has almost no spoken language.
and
child/young person is unable to form words or make adequate use of augmentative systems of communication.
and
child/young person has severe limitations in the expression of intentional communication. or child/young person has significant physical difficulties, with less cognitive impairment, which require voice output communication aids.   The child/young person may have an accumulation of layered needs, which could include mental health, relationships, behavioural, physical, medical, sensory, communication & cognitive needs.
Child/young person needs very early (infant) developmental programmes in relation to language/communication. Child/young person requires intensive training to acquire the limited use of means of alternative communication systems (e.g., signs/symbols systems). Child/young person requires intensive programmes to develop pre-lingual articulatory skills (i.e., formation of sounds in words). Child/young person needs programmes of work which recognises their high level of dependency in relation to language and communication. Intensive programmes of support to enable the child/young person to become competent users of communication aids / technology.  

The guest stars in todays transition meeting
* Lisa – SENCO
* Jenny – Specialised school representative
* Zara – Williams 1:1 support from nursery
* Chris – Head of chosen mainstream school
* Me – Mom, stress head, emotional wreck etc

For those who has tuned in to my blog before will notice Val isn’t listed as Williams 1:1 support, sadly Val decided to take partial retirement which means she no longer works Williams days. This did make me very sad as Val is amazing with William (Please feel free to remember when I pitched a fit because he left Linda to go to Val 🤣 I soon ate my words about that one) however William loves Zara and she has been in the sunshine room with him all along so i am quite happy with the change and happy for val to have some well deserved rest.

I got to meet the head of our chosen mainstream school today and she seems very similar to the head teacher who was in place when I attentended in the 90’s. She asked me to tell her about William, nothing specific but my view on what he is like as a child. I got a little emotional explaining how loving he is in his own ways but it was nice to be asked, not about his development or what he can and cant do but about how he is as my son.

Our chosen mainstream has two classes for Williams age group with each having 30 children, he is currently in a setting of only 8 kids so the transition may be a big shock for him, the plan is currently to aim to start this by the autumn term which is October/November rather than the standard September term. It will be easier for William to adapt to his new setting if he is eased into it slowly, starting out with shorter days or weeks which are to be agreed once his EHCP is in place. When this finally does come through I can name our chosen school with the view of a specialised setting in the future (ideally the following year🙏🏻)
On top of the EHCP naming I am also following the standardised appeal process to cover all bases to ensure we don’t have another crushing disappointment like we did when it came to specialised school allocations but i’m not holding my breath. Any parent of a child with special needs will tell you how fucked up the system is and how you get used to being let down by a system that is supposed to ensure your child has the best possible care.

As always I will keep you posted on what is to come and stay tuned for a catch up on other things that have happened within the last few months 😊

Much Love M.x

Posted in Emotions

Helter-Skelter

I think now is the time to talk about the past six months, this is not going to be a William centred post so if you want to tune out now that is fine. This is about the fight between the two sides of me. The side that six months ago was broken and wanted to curl up and die and then the side of me that needed to be as strong as two parents combined.

As most people will most likely agree with; heartbreak is one of the worst pains you can go through, you can’t take paracetamol to take away the pain, as only time can do that, but even though you feel time is all you have, you also feel that it isn’t on your side.

It may seem dramatic, but I felt like I was dying. Like my heart would not keep beating and I felt ok with that. That the pain would go if that happened.

Then there was a side of me that needed to be productive, I needed to get the house cleaner than it had ever been before, make sure my finances were in order, I needed to make sure William’s routines were protected, that he was comfortable and was not hurting like I was. I went into what can only be described as Stepford mom mode.
Between William waking up in a morning and going to sleep on the night, I was perfection; cooking cleaning, messy play and all the things in between. Smiling until my face hurt… ‘fake it until you make it’ so to speak.

Bedtime would roll around and then it was time to remove the mask, time to have my cry about all the thoughts I had pushed aside during the day, time to be broken.

The part of me that belonged in Stepford continued to make what I felt were the right decisions regarding him and tried my hardest to include his dad in these also.
The other part of me that was responsible for me, made some pretty questionable decisions and its now time to snap out of it but before I can do that, I needed to admit that I hadn’t been looking after my own health both mental and physical as well as I should have been.
I thought I would fall apart much more than I did, that I wouldn’t be able to go on but i’m stronger, healthier and much wiser. Divorce was never something I believed in, naive; I know, but now I am looking forward to starting the next chapter of my life. I am looking forward to finding out what is out there for a fat, working, single mom who may or may not have trust issues for me 🤣.

I have had a brilliant support network around me but only I could pull myself together and get off this helter-skelter slide and stand up tall again, albeit a little wobbly but here I am standing and ready to embark on my next adventure and new challenges
Speaking of which during May I have decided to partake in the 100 miles in May fundraiser to help raise money for the mental health charity Mind, I am asking that if you can spare anything, please donate as all funds go straight to the charity and its such a wonderful cause… https://www.facebook.com/donate/759292808292224/

Follow this link to donate to the Facebook fundraiser 😊