Posted in Causes

Behind the eyes

As many of you may have read previously William has been at the Hull Eye Hospital a few times to check his eyesight.

When children lack eye contact, depth perception and hand eye coordination the word autism doesn’t automatically spring to mind. Doctors and healthcare professionals will try to rule out any other issues and William’s visit to the Eye Hospital was one of his first exploratory check ups.

I want to tell you about the Hull Eye Hospital and how brilliant they have been with us. The staff are all so welcoming and were knowledgeable on how to deal with a child like William, they had a slew of highly engaging toys in order to try and get him to look in the right directions so they could look at his eyes. The waiting room for children however leaves a lot to be desired which is a big reason for my post but we will get to that. They make the most of the area they have and fill it with toys and books and sometimes very noisy children waiting for theirs or their siblings appointments. This atmosphere for children like William isn’t ideal but it is still much better than most places offer.

Hospital Chief Finance Officer, Lee Bond, is going to be doing something that some of us only dream about… well in my case have nightmares about, exercise!!! To be more precise he is planning on running the London Marathon, that’s 26.22 miles. Unless my math is exceptionally wrong (a high possibility) that works out on average if you were to walk it 52,440 steps

His goal is to raise £10,000. This will enable the opening of a sensory room for children with additional needs attending the Eye Hospital at Hull Royal Infirmary. The marathon is 5 months away (granted it has been postponed as should have been April I believe) they are only 59% towards the target which I’m hopefully can change quickly in the coming months.

For us as his parents any appointment brings upon anxiety and irrational thoughts. ‘What if he’s blind?’ ‘How will he handle wearing glasses?’ Etc etc… however as you are probably aware William’s eyesight is fine although he is due another check up before he can be discharged.If it brings anxiety out in us can you imagine how the child feels? An unknown clinical place, strangers and odd smells, waiting around without your usual security blankets (William’s are currently our metal egg poacher, his changing mat or the dog) Imagine not understanding why you are in this odd place or why people are trying to force eye contact upon you when you don’t want it and never have. Waving pictures your face and holding you still.

A sensory room could lessen the trauma for patients like William. There are multiple types of sensory rooms however the main focus is to help children feel comfortable and calm, explore in a safe environment and engage childrens sense. I think we could all use one in our workplaces or even right now in our ‘home offices’ also known in our house as a baby changing table next to a window.

Please think about any savings you have made whilst we have been on lockdown and try to dig deep to support such a wonderful cause that will help so many! So I implore you, please spare anything you can and use the link below to donate. X

https://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/charity-web/charity/displayCharityCampaignPage.action?charityCampaignUrl=HullEyeHospitalSensoryRoom

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